12 Comments

  1. Laura
    July 22, 2019 @ 8:54 am

    I used to love your blog. The negativity has really taken a turn and every post seems to be about how hopeless you feel and how you don’t want him to sweep the floor and you’re trying to love his autism. At the same time, you say it is a strand of his DNA. As a mother you love your children with your whole heart. You should not have to try to love the autistic part.

    Yes, I have a son with autism. He is 16. He is at ESY at this very moment where he is working in the garden and the bee keeper is coming today. Later this week they are going bowling and HE IS HAPPY. Before my kids were born, I didn’t know if they were boys or girls, shy or outgoing, athletic or a klutz like me. I did not know if they had autism or not and to be honest, it matters not. The only wish I have is to make life a bit easier for him.

    I wish the sentiment that you put out was not so negative. Not all parents of children with autism are miserable.

    Reply

  2. Carrie Cariello
    July 22, 2019 @ 10:25 am

    I am sorry to hear this, Laura. Perhaps we are at different places on our journey with autism. I wish you all the best with your son and your family.

    Reply

    • Deb Pacella
      July 29, 2019 @ 9:14 am

      I feel exactly like you Carrie, and am glad someone can finally say ” Yes, I love my son, but Autism sucks and I would truly love a cure!!

      Reply

  3. Tammy C.
    July 22, 2019 @ 10:38 am

    I love your writing! Life is full of ups and downs and positives and negatives–sometimes at the same time! I like that you share your feelings whether they are perceived as positive or negative, it is just feelings put into writing…

    Reply

  4. Lisa
    July 22, 2019 @ 12:00 pm

    I also love your writing; I can very much relate to your blog. I don’t find your writing negative. I find it real, raw, and beautiful. Thanks for having the courage to put yourself out there for the world to judge.

    Reply

  5. Pam Carlson
    July 22, 2019 @ 12:08 pm

    I love reading your blogs. Somehow you have always managed to put into words my feelings about my own son and my own family & marriage. I don’t see your writings as negative, but as REAL. Keep on writing. Thank you!

    Reply

  6. LT
    July 22, 2019 @ 12:17 pm

    It’s funny, mostly, I read both struggle (which I suppose can be seen as negative) and hope in your words. Here and on facebook. Some days, it is almost impossibly hard, you are telling us. And some days, it’s great. And some days, it’s just your life. I don’t have kids with autism. Or kids at all for that matter. But I work at a nature center and work with school groups, and families, and kids of all types every day. And reading your words each week helps me to better understand what our families are going through. To try to help make triumphs happen and offer support during the troughs. I appreciate how willing you all to put it all out there, and know that it is helping us learn!

    Reply

  7. Diane Adams
    July 22, 2019 @ 12:29 pm

    I have followed your blog for several years, and through my tears – thank you. I feel less alone. This is a difficult journey. One that we never planned on, but will travel for the rest of our lives. Thank you from the bottom of my heart for putting what I feel into words.You are beyond a blessing.

    Reply

  8. caredfield
    July 22, 2019 @ 1:16 pm

    Carrie…..I have not read a post in a while but I do love your writing and your honesty about the struggles and the wondering about what will be the future for your child. We wonder about that for all of our children but it is different for our children on the spectrum because as you said there is player involved, called autism. My son was diagnosed on the spectrum when he was 3 years old. It seems so long ago and yet the scared feelings and worry are not hard to recall. They come right back and I read your post and I know how blessed we are and how far my son has come. He is packing his bags and completing his new student checklist as he prepares to leave for Syracuse University…….I cannot even believe it but he did it. Of course all the worries come back because this is a whole new level of challenges and I won’t be there since he will be so far from North Carolina. He is the sweetest, most charming boy and we will work on doing the laundry and cooking a few things and I pray he continues to self advocate and I hope that a career in broadcasting becomes a reality and that he does well at school. Thinking about you and Jack and your family and praying for my Trey. I think that he would like Jack.

    Reply

  9. Scott Wilcox
    July 22, 2019 @ 1:47 pm

    You write what you feel, dear Carrie. You don’t hold back and we love you for it, and you help most of us put in words what we cannot. I’ve been struggling with this for over 30 years, and I don’t know if it gets easier, or I have just become numb from all the hats I’ve worn over the years, and without a mate for most of it. Every week when I read your blogs, I feel better, sometimes cry, and laugh and worry. But I know what we go through, who go through together. God bless you and your family.

    Reply

  10. Courtney
    July 22, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Carrie. I have been an avid reader of your blog for years. I love your candid thoughts and views. I think when people sugarcoat nuanced feelings and situations like yours it is actually patronizing. This blog is a lifeline for people. Keep going

    Reply

  11. Maggie
    July 24, 2019 @ 1:12 pm

    Carrie – I have been a devoted reader of your blogs for many years. My daughter works with adults with disabilities in Indianapolis and I often talk to her about the things you write in your blog. I’ve noticed that your writings have focused more on the struggles lately. I think it makes sense as Jack gets older. My cousin has a daughter with an intellectual disability and as she got older, my cousin and her husband became more serious in their discussions of her future. Where does she fit in? Who will take care of her when her parents are gone? Here in Illinois, you have to go before a judge and declare that you want to live with your parents if you’re an adult with a disability. This can be very upsetting. I like that you do not turn away from the hard truths. Keep writing and we’ll keep reading.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Tammy C. Cancel reply

%d bloggers like this: