16 Comments

  1. Tammy
    November 9, 2015 @ 10:34 am

    I am struggling today and most days with the strangeness of autism. How it sometimes goes in way that nothing ever should. I get asked uestions about what autism is. I can give a clinical statement but that does not cover how painful it is when the school picture comes to me that I have paid for and the autism mask is there and it screams….AUTISM! MY CHILD IS DIFFERENT AND I DON’T WANT HIM TO BE! Yes, I hate autism! When things are going badly I look at my son and say….I hate autism. Nash will smile and say “I hate autism!” We treat autism like a cousin we don;t like to play with. This makes it easy for Nash to know I do NOT hate him but the things that autism brings to our house. Thanks for being there 🙂

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  2. Theresa
    November 9, 2015 @ 10:53 am

    In one second the tears welled up and I was gone. My son is not technically autistic but he has struggled with learning disabilities and some pretty tough social bullying throughout his life. He is a senior in high school now and I still cry sometimes knowing that he is always walking uphill trying to “fit in”. When (hopefully) he graduates this year I really think 30 or 40 of us should walk with him. The village of friends and professionals who have done their part in helping to raise his head to process and thrive in the world. It is isolating for us Moms who have these kids. We have to work hard to not just close the door to the other families of children who take multiple AP classes and attend every social function with their group of 20 close friends. Thank you, Carrie, for keeping your door open for all of us who struggle with the day to day and who have the need to talk it out now and then.

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  3. marie
    November 9, 2015 @ 10:55 am

    This is wonderfully written. As a mother, I feel pain whenever my child is in pain. That is the hardest thing to bear about “Autism.” We watch them go through their struggles every day with respect to school, communication and loneliness but we know that there is a very loving and intelligent little boy “in there.” At the same time, we struggle with our own frustrations toward the autistic behaviors of the child that we love so dearly. My son is 17 and he doesn’t like the idea of ever moving away from us. Our kids love us and find happiness in us. That is the bright side in our daily challenges. That is, we are able to bring them some happiness among their daily struggles. **Hugs and Blessings to you and your son***

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  4. Pam Carlson
    November 9, 2015 @ 11:53 am

    Carrie, thank you for putting into words the way I have so often felt about my 30-year-old son with Autism. I cry when I read your blogs.

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    • Pam Carlson
      November 9, 2015 @ 11:53 am

      I also laugh out loud when I read your blogs! 🙂

      Reply

      • Jeannie
        November 9, 2015 @ 5:56 pm

        That is exactly what I said last week about Carrie’s post. I agree – even though her situation’s not just the same as mine, I recognize the truth in what she writes So blessed by this blog.

        Reply

  5. Mxtrmeike13
    November 9, 2015 @ 7:26 pm

    Thank you for this glimpse into Jack’s life (and yours, too!). I’m in my last year of school to become a therapist and I’m looking to specialize in 1) autism spectrum disorders and 2) gender dysphoria, two things that oddly seem to go together frequently. It’s very refreshing and great to read about ASD from the caregiver’s perspective, and you do it in such a beautiful way.

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  6. Deb
    November 9, 2015 @ 10:02 pm

    This for to make me cry.

    Reply

  7. Bianca
    November 10, 2015 @ 7:04 am

    Your Monday blogs remind me show more care & patience towards my 3 yr old boy. Your blog makes me a better mother.

    Reply

  8. Marlene
    November 14, 2015 @ 5:15 am

    Carrie, I laughed and cried as I resonated with your story. Thank you for your honesty, for baring your soul to strangers…. you are a blessing.

    Reply

  9. Sonya
    November 14, 2015 @ 4:16 pm

    Go to NAET natural healing for autism

    Reply

  10. Dineen
    November 14, 2015 @ 4:57 pm

    My daughter’s conversational idiosyncrasies that sometimes feel like emotional root canals, teasing words and phrases out over the course of days often have just this sort of feeling. Oh, the joys of loving someone on the spectrum.
    As a wife to a man with ASD and a mom to a daughter with it as well, I am happy to have found your blog through Ann Voskamp.

    Reply

  11. Pam
    November 15, 2015 @ 7:26 am

    Today was hard. Very hard. Frequently at a loss in dealing with all the fallout related to my precious boys spectrum issues. So glad I found your blog cause sometimes it just helps to know that others ‘get it’ and I am not alone in some parallel universe with all this.

    Reply

  12. Vicki
    November 15, 2015 @ 2:01 pm

    Beautifully written. You are a blessing, not only to your family, but to all Moms. I hope you feel the support of other women as you go about your day.

    Reply

  13. sheri Shingler
    November 17, 2015 @ 2:04 pm

    Isn’t it strange how lonely autism can feel? Sometimes I don’t realise it until I read your words

    Reply

  14. Fuzzy Panda Barista
    April 4, 2016 @ 9:14 am

    This is so beautifully written. It is genuine. Thanks for sharing.Most of us know very little about Autism and Asperger. Just know this: you are the expert on your son and therefore you are the best mother for him. May God give you strength, patience and wisdom every day.

    Reply

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