10 Comments

  1. Tammy
    March 16, 2015 @ 4:44 pm

    A friend of mine shared your blog with me recently. How can I even thank you for putting your words, and experiences out there for us all to share. Jack is amazing…he is very, very much like my own Ethan and I laugh and cry when I read your blog. I feel stressed and relieved and like my own thoughts are being pulled from my head and translated through another persons hands. Thank you isn’t enough, but since that’s all I have; Thank You.

    Reply

    • Veronica
      March 16, 2015 @ 8:39 pm

      Every post I read I feel like I could just switch out “Jack” for “Noah” (or Panda, as he prefers to be called). So, so many similarities, but both unique, wonderful boys.

      Reply

      • Tammy
        March 17, 2015 @ 12:41 am

        Wow…..I have not met many parents of a kid kinda like mine. I love your blog…it feels safe. I connect with it. My son is the high-medium-low functioning kinda kid. A lot of people say they don’t see it…but I do everyday. Like at night when I have to hear about the weather for 15 minutes as he proceeds to tell me how it will be for the next 24 hours…in 1 hour increments. And to make sure I know that he will be in this place or that place at that specific time when the weather will be…… Autism…I am still so pissed off at it but, the weirdness and quirks make me laugh. Thanks for your blog…I am so glad I found it.

        Reply

  2. Josie
    March 17, 2015 @ 6:57 am

    Thank you Carrie. You help ,e see God.

    Reply

  3. jolaidlaw
    March 17, 2015 @ 9:46 am

    I had to postpone my ‘weekly cry at Carrie’s blog’ yesterday because I was at work, so here I am on a Tuesday crying real tears into my coffee. Thanks so much for both ‘getting it’ and being able to express it.

    Reply

  4. Amy Richardson
    March 17, 2015 @ 10:46 am

    I am SO thankful I found your blog!! You put so beautifully into words what I feel every. single. day. Your Jack sounds like my Jack in so many ways. I know you and I would be fast friends if we ever crossed paths. Thank you for sharing your heart!! It brightens my day more than you know.

    Reply

  5. Holly Moore
    March 17, 2015 @ 11:04 am

    This post made me very teary! What a feeling to watch your child transform before your eyes. It took me back to my, now 16 yr old’s, first middle school talent show in 6th grade. He had suddenly decided he wanted to be a ventriloquist. So Santa brought him a puppet for Christmas, and I helped him write some jokes. He was pretty stiff and stilted during bedroom rehearsals and I had no idea how he would react to a live audience. I was filled with all the same fears you described. I assumed he would recite his script in his usual halting, autistic manner, but I was in for a huge surprise! I was stunned to watch him come alive on stage. His timing and delivery seemed to come naturally. And when the audience (filled with judgmental middle schoolers) erupted in cheers and a standing ovation, I could not control my sobbing. Since then, we’ve learned to live with a very witty & weird comedian in our midst. He plans to make a career out of this, so be warned: your future may include a cake baking comedy show! If you feel inclined, here’s a link to that 1st performance. https://youtu.be/skCMPO-e9qQ

    Reply

  6. Cathy
    March 17, 2015 @ 2:07 pm

    I’ve been wanting to post and let you know how much your blog has meant to me, but didn’t think I would be able to express it very well. After reading the other recent posts from other moms, I decided I don’t have to reinvent the wheel. Apparently you have touched these other women just the same way you have touched (and helped) me. I just had my “weekly cry” as well. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

    Reply

  7. Jo Raymond
    March 17, 2015 @ 2:14 pm

    Yay! I’m glad it went well. The whole scenario would make me nervous too. He’s such a cutie and I love reading about all your/his adventures.

    Reply

  8. terismyth
    March 20, 2015 @ 1:20 am

    OMG. Many of your son’s quirks I can relate to also. When you reminded me of when my son would repeat words or sentences from movies or tv, it hit a cord. That was a challenging time. Also hearing about the other mom’s stories of their child’s acts on stage reminds me of when my son had his first choir solo in 5th grade. It was the end of the year DARE concert and my Andrew finally agreed to sing a solo verse of “A Mighty Wind A Blowin”. He told me in the morning on the way to school that he would sing with an “authentic voice”. I had no idea what that meant, and I still giggle when I remember that.
    Andrew sang so pure and beautifully that the entire audience stood and clapped for him. It was a huge moment for our family because none of us knew our son could sing like that.
    The most amazing part is that he has participated in many choirs since then through church, high school,and now college. He was even given scholarship money for his voice. My husband and I gladly attend his concerts and video each and every one of them.
    Next month, Andrew will sing at Carnegie Hall with St Mary’s College of Moraga in California’s choir, AND he was given a solo. He is thrilled and we couldn’t be more proud.
    He still has challenges waking up on time, getting organized with his assignments and turning them in on time, executive functioning skills, etc But we take those issues a day at a time.
    Your articles bring me tears of joy and some painful memories, but I wouldn’t change anything about my son.
    “Andrewtism” is an E book written by my husband, in case anyone is interested in more about our story.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Holly Moore Cancel reply

%d bloggers like this: