7 Comments

  1. Lisa
    February 9, 2015 @ 2:45 pm

    Simply beautiful!!! I love reading your blog posts, as we are just entering this ‘unknown & mysterious” world. We think our 4 1/2 year old has Sensory Processing Disorder with high anxiety. He will be evaluated soon, and is currently receiving weekly OT sessions. Your love for your son is awesome & we feel the same about ours! We wouldn’t change him for anything, but we do want to help him learn how to navigate through our world! Thank you for this post. It fills me with hope for whatever adventure we are about to embark upon.

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  2. Kathy@9peas
    February 9, 2015 @ 3:21 pm

    I’m so glad I found you, so soon after our diagnosis and while I’m grappling with…with…with it all. You are a balm that touches my heart, gets me talking (writing) and helps me to laugh because I love your sense of humor. Benjamin my boy who has shown me a whole new world, is the youngest of 9 and has proven that I didn’t know everything about parenting and nothing about how to view the world – as hard, as completely painful as it is…it is the most beautiful journey I’ve ever been on and I wouldn’t change a thing (except maybe the meltdowns, I’d like to change those).
    P.S. I think back a lot to the children I knew while growing up, the ones I didn’t understand and this post just resonated with me, thank you for always sharing.

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  3. Ann Kilter
    February 9, 2015 @ 8:28 pm

    When my son was diagnosed with autism 20 years ago, the best books on autism were very negative in terms of likely prognosis for even the most mildly affected individuals. How th e outlook has changed in 20 YEARS.

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  4. Ann Kilter
    February 9, 2015 @ 8:30 pm

    Notice your intuitive underdtanding of your son and ability to accept and usebit to his profit.

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  5. Annette Whipple
    February 10, 2015 @ 8:12 am

    So much we didn’t know then…

    I came to find you from the Huff Post. Thank you for sharing your stories and articulating what so many need to understand.

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  6. Lisa H.
    February 10, 2015 @ 11:53 am

    I love your perspective. I have a 20-year-old brother with Asperger’s and it would have been so helpful to have advocates like you back when he was being judged and rejected by a world that labeled him “weird.” Now I am mother of two young children and I hope to be able to educate them about people with autism so they don’t become the ones who tease the “weird” kids. You are absolutely right. My brother brings joy to our lives and offers us an opportunity to see the world in new and interesting ways. Thank you for sharing your journey so openly.

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  7. Holly Moore
    February 10, 2015 @ 3:27 pm

    Tears… I too, am grateful for the Christophers. Not a day goes by that my heart doesn’t break a little when I think of “those kids”; the ones who disappeared; the ones who were segregated to the resource room where the most complicated thing they learned was how to roll a cart to deliver AV equipment to the “normal” classrooms; the ones locked up in institutions where no one ever thought to try to reach them because they assumed them to be unreachable. Sadly, sometimes these things are still happening, but so much less, and less, and less each day. Thank you Christopher, wherever you are.

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