6 Comments

  1. jonicorcoran
    May 8, 2017 @ 5:30 am

    I look forward to reading your blog each Monday. My grandson is in the spectrum.

    Reply

  2. Glenna Toyne
    May 8, 2017 @ 5:49 am

    You weave silky yarn very well Carrie. Xxx

    Reply

  3. Patsy Marino
    May 8, 2017 @ 6:34 am

    Hi Carrie. My 12 year old son, Tate has autism too. I’ve been reading your blog for years-shortly after Tate was diagnosed at age 7. In fact, when I mentor Autism Mommas who have just received that news, I encourage them to read your blog, among other books and blogs. This note is way overdue. My husband and I regularly discuss your weekly writings and I frequently send them to Tate’s team or my family to help them understand. Of course, no one will understand quite like we do. But, your words help. a lot.
    Today you wrote that you are starting to help Jack break down how he feels post melt down and share how it makes you feel too. This is a brilliant idea! I’m going to begin doing this too.
    Thank you for shining a light on autism and for saying so many of the things that I think and feel too.
    If you ever find yourself in San Diego, I’d like to meet you to tell you in person, how much it all matters.

    Reply

  4. Alison
    May 8, 2017 @ 8:05 am

    Yes, you do. And although I don’t have a boy like Jack in my family, I am always looking for the special Jacks in my town. Because of you and your incredible vulnerability and beautiful writing, I hope that I will be patient and kind to them.

    Reply

  5. Carrie Wailgum
    May 8, 2017 @ 4:02 pm

    DEAR CARRIE, WE HAVE TWIN GRANDSONS WHO ARE ON THE AUTISM SPECTRUM TOO. YOUR BLOGS HELP MY HUSBAND AND ME UNDERSTAND WHAT THE TWINS AND THEIR PARENTS ARE GOING THROUGH. THANK YOU FOR REACHING OUT TO OTHER PARENTS, GRANDPARENTS AND FAMILY OF AUTISTIC CHILDREN. CARRIE W.

    Reply

  6. Jimmy
    May 9, 2017 @ 5:43 am

    Hello Carrie, and Hello Jack.
    I have Autism too, and so does my eldest son. Through him being diagnosed, my ‘quirks’ got noticed and I’m on my way to being diagnosed. We’re milder, sure, but it’s there none the less. Dealing with Typicals is like playing Poker with a full Tarot Deck – You have way better cards, but they’re not right for the system you’re in.

    You will find less friends, but the quality of the friends you get will be so much higher. These people, your friends and your loved ones, will be fiercely loyal because they get to see all the brilliance and kindness in you. They will still get annoyed at you when you’re being rigid, but instead of hinting things at you, they’ll tell you straight, and help you.

    The workplace will be weird with all it’s unwritten rules you’re expected to know, but the secret there is tell people there will be times you need space, and make it easy for them to spot these times. Again the people who ally themselves with you will be good people, they all come pre-tested by dealing with you. We can sometimes get wrapped up in ourselves, so consciously take time to be good to your friends, you’ll get it back by the bucket.

    Also, get a hobby where you can be with others (I do archery) as just because you’re different doesn’t mean you want to be a recluse. Otherwise, chin up, show them what you’re made of, and good luck.

    Reply

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