24 Comments

  1. Cathy Ballou Mealey
    November 23, 2015 @ 12:24 pm

    “Oh yes,” he smiled at her. It was not a real smile that made his face look happy, but more like he stretched the corners of his mouth. “It is everywhere.”

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  2. Amy G.
    November 23, 2015 @ 12:52 pm

    Love it. Thank you again.

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  3. Kathy
    November 23, 2015 @ 2:12 pm

    “You and I, we can’t be something or someone we’re not. We can’t change all the way for each other. But this does not mean we won’t be friends.” You said it all Jack…that is all I wish for my son Nick and the world…to be friends.

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  4. Jamie
    November 23, 2015 @ 2:13 pm

    Reading this helps me to understand my own son. Which I know will never really happen fully because he thinks so different than the rest of us. Thanks

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  5. Jeannie
    November 23, 2015 @ 3:00 pm

    Jack, my daughter is 17 (she has Asperger’s) and she would probably say the same thing as you did to the lady about the snow. (But she wouldn’t use the word “freaking,” so it wouldn’t be exactly the same as you said.) Keep on being yourself, Jack. We like hearing about your experiences.

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    • Josii
      January 29, 2016 @ 7:54 pm

      I am 18,and have Aspergers, and that snow thing is really bothering me… i would of said the same thing.. And I still dont get it :/

      Reply

  6. Jan
    November 23, 2015 @ 4:01 pm

    Jack, you put words to things I don’t have words for. Thank you for being yourself and helping me to understand the “Jack” that lives in my house (his name is Brody).

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  7. Keri @ Reluctantly Suburban
    November 23, 2015 @ 5:02 pm

    Thank you.
    My words are failing me.
    Just thank you.

    Reply

  8. Christine Duffley
    November 23, 2015 @ 6:35 pm

    Dear Jack and Carrie, how awesome to read this piece. Jack, you are an excellent writer. I am just like your mom, Jack. Sometimes I just say “Stop” and I wish I had a better way to turn off that thought or feeling for my son, Christopher who is 14 and autistic as well. Thank you for being “real”, funny and helping the world know your world. You are special to the world, never forget… and together we make the world more gentle and loving. Christine Duffley

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  9. Sue Davis
    November 23, 2015 @ 8:24 pm

    What a thoughtful, beautiful post.

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  10. Kimberly
    November 23, 2015 @ 8:53 pm

    Thank you for your words Jack.

    Reply

  11. Sara
    November 23, 2015 @ 9:02 pm

    Dear Carrie, you’ve done it again. I’m here in Tokyo, Japan, in my old adopted home which i haven’t visited for 10 years and having an amazing time. Maybe because my heart is already so open because of this wonderful experience i am having, or maybe because of the gifted writer that you are, i’m reading your post with tears streaming down my face. “… we found a way to talk to him. We loved him.” This is my wish for my own dear son, for everyone who suffers, for the entire world – for those around them to find a way to love them.

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  12. Kirsty @ My Home Truths
    November 23, 2015 @ 9:47 pm

    I loved reading this. We took our 11 yo to WDW earlier this year which involved a long haul flight from Australia and weeks away from home. We did a LOT of preparation to get him there and we all ended up having the best time but I could definitely see him in this post. He struggled whenever we dined in particular because of the noise and distractions but he loved the rides which seemed to give him the sensory input he needed to get through it. He wasn’t as much of a fan of Space Mountain – once was enough for him – but he went on the Seven Dwarves Mine Train multiple times and always came away with a smile.

    Reply

  13. Deb
    November 23, 2015 @ 10:51 pm

    You always make me cry.

    Reply

  14. Tammy
    November 24, 2015 @ 1:13 am

    We went to Disneyland 2 weeks ago for my daughter’s 18th birthday. I prepared so much for Nash, age 10 to enjoy this trip as much as he could. We went 3 years ago when we didn’t really understand all that autism is and how to deal with it and our son. We did better this time. I hate autism so much most days and other days just fascinated by it and how it works…or doesn’t. You always bring an emotion that I can’t feel at the time because if I do…I may not be able to stop. Thanks for your Monday writing.

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  15. Gigi
    November 24, 2015 @ 7:34 am

    Great piece. Have you heard of the Brain supplement, EHT? It helps regular people, like me, who don’t have autism with mental clarity. It helps me focus and I no longer have times when I’m searching for words. It’s botanically based and was discovered by the researchers at Princeton university. It might help you get a different perspective. Email me for more info or go to: http://skincarewonder.buyneriumeht.com/

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  16. Autism Mom
    November 24, 2015 @ 10:49 am

    Beautiful. This is my favorite part: “…my mom tells me a lot that autism is not a secret—it is not something to feel embarrassed or ashamed of, because it is as much a part of me as the freckle on my left leg.”

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  17. Alexis R.
    November 27, 2015 @ 1:25 pm

    This is so beautiful. I work in a classroom for severe autism at a middle school, and each and every child has my heart in their hands. They try so hard to fit into the world – but it’s the world who needs to try harder to fit them in. Love and hugs to Jack and your family.

    Reply

  18. Kristen M.
    November 28, 2015 @ 3:03 pm

    Thank you Jack. My 8 year old son has HFASD, and I will read this to him. I just know he will identify with most of what you said. It will make him feel better to know that someone else feels the same. Please continue being yourself! You are truly amazing!

    Reply

  19. hernameishope
    November 28, 2015 @ 7:50 pm

    This blog post is so full, deep… Thank you for sharing with us a piece of your heart. <3. Take care & God Bless! 🙂

    Reply

  20. Janet Anderson
    November 29, 2015 @ 5:28 pm

    Every blog post I read makes me a better person and Jack is such a special person. A gift from God to all of us who share living with the same fears, wondering if our loved one will fit into society. He is perfect in the eyes of God and will always be. Carrie thank you for sharing your family with us and the world. You are a blessing.

    Reply

  21. Jenn M
    November 30, 2015 @ 12:40 am

    “I could not see her face, but I could feel her wearing her sadness on her body like an itchy sweater” ~ Carrie, this is my favorite line because Jack describes you exactly as I feel when I’m trying to ‘hide’ behind a happy face but my thoughts for my own ASD son can scare me on the inside

    Reply

  22. Dear world: This is what autism really feels like to me. – Top Posts Ever
    June 14, 2016 @ 4:43 am

    […] story originally appeared on the author’s blog and is republished here with permission. Thumbnail image from the author, used with […]

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  23. Dear world: This is what autism really feels like to me. | My Blog
    June 15, 2016 @ 1:57 am

    […] story originally appeared on the author’s blog and is republished here with permission. Thumbnail image from the author, used with […]

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