17 Comments

  1. Kim D
    August 10, 2015 @ 12:48 pm

    I am crying, trying not to sob, with tears of understanding flowing down my face…as always, you write as if you are inside my head. My prayers will be with all of you that this year is as smooth as it can be and that Jack doesn’t have to try as hard, that he finds that true friend, and that one day that backpack holds that elusive birthday party invitation.

    Reply

  2. Lee
    August 10, 2015 @ 12:52 pm

    I look forward to your posts every Monday. Our sons are so similar and the familiarity in your stories provides me with comfort. For that, I thank you.

    Reply

  3. leighbug
    August 10, 2015 @ 1:02 pm

    Great story, I loved it. Check out my blog and maybe leave feedback? 🙂

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  4. Scott Wilcox
    August 10, 2015 @ 1:30 pm

    Again I thank you Carrie. Tears and sometimes sobs often accompany your weekly entries. Heather’s Angelman Syndrome is different, but on many ways the same. God bless us all.

    Reply

  5. Jennifer
    August 10, 2015 @ 2:53 pm

    Beautiful! Our boys are the same age and I can identify with so much of what you’ve shared here. Thank you.

    Reply

  6. Vivien Lobell
    August 10, 2015 @ 3:23 pm

    Every Monday I avidly read your postings and often share them with my colleagues. Todays post made me consider what I could possibly do differently for the beginning of the school year to make the transition easier not just for the autistic students on my case load but also for the parents, in particular dedicated moms. Any advice would be welcome After decades of practice as an occupational therapist with special needs students I am grateful for your insights and anecdotes. I (and many professionals on the team I work with) often wonder and marvel at how parents cope. So. We are open to your suggestions! Thank you for sharing your helpful blog! Wishing you a successful and productive academic year for all your beautiful children. Sincerely , Vivien Lobell

    Sent from my iPhone

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  7. Lisa
    August 10, 2015 @ 4:27 pm

    I, too, look forward to your post every Monday. My grandson just turned four last week and I’m still trying to accept his diagnosis. Your blog and your books are invaluable to me. I can’t imagine being glad for his autism someday but I’ve heard you get there. Right now I’m stuck in the “looking for a cure” phase. I just want the best for him and his being typical seems like an easier life. Thanks for sharing your family, and especially Jack, with us.

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  8. Allison
    August 10, 2015 @ 9:36 pm

    Thank you. I enjoy your posts every week. Once I think I wrote a comment saying I live in LA now, but am from NH and return every summer to be with family. My son is autistic too, high functioning. The birthday invitations and friends are few and far between – I feel your pain (is it pain? I don’t mean to assume!). I worry about the coming tween and teen years, about depression (just learned a few months ago that this is a very real possibility) and really understanding how different he is. Although some of the differences are lessening as he grows, and others are becoming clearer and coming in to sharp and painful focus, at least for me. You are a brilliant writer and I thank you for many things.

    Reply

  9. NickyB.
    August 10, 2015 @ 10:52 pm

    I am crying now. So familiar, so true, so real, and beautiful!

    Reply

  10. Tammy
    August 11, 2015 @ 12:50 am

    I love reading your posts because I see a kinship. Today that kinship is sad….being the backpack, seeing the change is hard. Seeing the frustration, the change, the mumbles of words that feel good in your mouth, the look of panic that only a Mom can see on that face.

    Reply

  11. Dana
    August 11, 2015 @ 10:18 am

    Every time I read your blog, I picture my own son Triston. He has autism too andvis so similar to Jack.

    Reply

  12. MeanderingDude
    August 11, 2015 @ 1:43 pm

    Your story, well when you get in an elevator and it drops suddenly. That is what my stomach did. It was wonderful, I never tire of your style. Thank you.

    Reply

  13. Barb
    August 12, 2015 @ 2:43 pm

    Carrie, Thank you for sharing every Monday. I do not have a child with autism but I teach middle school and have had many in my classes. I read your blog to keep having new insight. My daughter is in medical school, and I was so excited for her when she told me last spring after a rotation that she thought she found he specialty…behavioral and developmental disabilities. She loved working with children and teens with autism, CP as well as other disabilities. I sent her the link to your blog. I know she will be fabulous at this as she has always had a passion for others with disabilities. Jack sounds like a fabulous young man and I wish you and your family all the amazing memories that family bring.

    Reply

    • Scott Wilcox
      August 13, 2015 @ 6:06 am

      Barb,
      Please thank your daughter from us, for her decision.
      And thank you, too, for giving her the basis of compassion to go into medicine, and this specialty.

      Reply

  14. Pat Gauvresu
    August 15, 2015 @ 4:33 pm

    I presume you’ve heard of a Temple Grandin. The most famous autistic person on the planet. She’s been a blessing for cattle and the human race. Gives lectures and is making an enormous impact in this world on many levels.

    Reply

  15. Deb
    August 16, 2015 @ 12:37 pm

    You understand your son. So much of how he feels is how we all feel at times, his is more a matter of intensity. I’m not so different from your son, I suffer from intensity as well. It has it’s pluses and it’s minuses, as does everything. He’s lucky to have you as his mom. I’m sure it’s not easy raising him.

    Reply

  16. Why I Ride the Short Bus | The Dish
    March 6, 2017 @ 1:47 pm

    […] Rose feel bad for me, but it is for me okay. I like it. I sit there in the quiet and I hold my red backpack on my lap and I twist the strap. It makes me feel good and peaceful, like a balloon that is letting […]

    Reply

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